Posted in Whatever(but important to me atleast)

Paw Aid (First Aid For Dogs)

WHY IS FIRST AID IMPORTANT

  • Pet first aid can mean the difference between life and death
  • 25 percent of pets can be saved if just one basic skill or technique was applied prior to receiving veterinary care.
  • Appropriate first aid measures can keep your animal alive until you are able to get to a vet.

RESTRAINING A INJURED DOG

  • If the dog is a stray and if you have a leash make a loop out of it by passing the end that would normally attach to the leash through the handle loop then loop the converted leash over his head and gently tighten.
  • If you don’t have a leash or if the leash is not working throw a blanket or towel over the dog and don’t go near the mouth
  • Once the dog is wrapped in the blanket scoop the dog up into your arms and make sure of the position of the dogs mouth and claws because most probably it will be determined to bite through the blanket.
  • Put the dog in a box
  • In an emergency situation where a dog has breathing problems make the dog lie on its right side.
  • Use soft tones to talk to the dog
  • Use a muzzle (unless the dog is vomiting or unconscious)
  • If you don’t have a muzzle, make one out of a gauze roll.
  • Wrap it around the snout quickly but not too tight that the dog can’t breathe
  • Watch the dog carefully to make sure it can breathe comfortably.
  • For a small dog hold the front and rear legs of the dog to prevent it from kicking and keep the injured side of the dog against your body.
  • For a large dog place the dog on a blanket or towel as a stretcher.CPR

  • The dog has suddenly fallen and is unconscious
  • Watch to see if the dogs chest lifts they breathe about 20-30 times per minute so it should life about 2-3 times
  • If it doesn’t you need CPR.

BROKEN LIMB

  • You can see any bone sticking out
  • The leg is in the wrong angle or position
  • The dog picks up the leg and attempts to walk on three.
  • Refuses to walk or play because of the pain altogether or engage in normally playful activities.
  • In such instances, there is a possibility that your dog is in pain because of a broken leg.
  • Watch for Unusual Aggression:
  • Your dog is making unusual sound, they may be in pain.
  • Loss of appetite and is isolating itself

WHAT TO DO

  • Restrain the dog
  • Use a carrier, wooden plaque or blanket to transport them
  • Restrain them properly so that it doesn’t cause more injury

WOUNDS

Abrasions

Abrasions take place when the surface layers of a dog’s skin are scraped which causes a small area of inflammation, surface bleeding, and bruising.  The most common causes are when your dog is scratching or chewing at an area or jumping fences, fighting and being dragged by a leash.

  • Trim the hair surrounding the wounded area
  • Wipe with hydrogen peroxide use a one to one dilution and apply pressure with a gauze pad.
  • When bleeding stops rinse with clean water
  • Take the dog to the vet

A BRUISE

  • Use a ice pack on and off at 15 minute intervals until the bruise has gone down a little
  • 24 hours later use a heat pad to improve blood circulation and healing.

Lacerations  

Lacerations take place when your dog’s skin is cut or torn open. The wound that has clean edges and is well-defined and only superficial in nature, or it can have rough edges and be can dirty, affecting several layers of the skin and into the muscle tissue.

LACERATIONS WITH CLEAN EDGES

  • Wipe with hydrogen peroxide use a one to one dilution and apply pressure with a gauze pad.
  • Take the dog to the vet
  • Oral antibiotics and oral pain medication will most likely be prescribed.

LACERATIONS WITH ROUGH EDGES

  • Wipe with hydrogen peroxide use a one to one dilution.
  • Apply pressure with a gauze pad.
  • Take the dog to the vet immediately

MOST LIKELY SURGERY WILL BE REQUIRED

The wounds that are left open during the will require regular bandaging or a drain put in place to allow a pathway for infection to drain out of the tissues.

Oral antibiotics and oral pain medication will most likely be prescribed to assist in the healing process.

BITE WOUNDS/PUNCTURE WOUNDS

Bacteria can enter the dog’s wound and cause infection at a very fast rate.  Usually cat bite wounds have a tendency to be small puncture wounds but they become infected very quickly.  Dog bites can be large punctures concerning deep layers of skin and muscle, or they can also appear as gashes most of the time it’s around the neck or ear of your dog.

WILD ANIMAL BITES

  • Get her to the vet straight away
  • The dog may require a rabies vaccination or booster
  • Watch for change in personality in the dog, it does not eat, may fear water, its anxious and aggressive or even more friendly than normal.

DOG BITES

  • If bitten by a known dog consult the owner about its vaccination and also consult the vet.
  • Wash the bite with water
  • Disinfect with Betadine diluted with warm water tea or use a saline solution
  • If bitten by a unknown dog take the dog to the vet straight away

Snake bites and insect bites are part of poisonings

BLEEDING IN SPURTS

A blood vessel has probably been broken

Make a tourniquet (see diagram below) out of a shoelace or a long piece of gauze don’t tie it too tight only tight enough that the bleeding has stopped.

INTERNAL BLEEDING

  • Watch the dog
  • Mostly important sign of internal bleeding is to monitor the colour of the gums and the eyes
  • Watch out for restlessness, the dog stops moving, cries out a lot, has pale gums, bloody diarrhoea, bloody vomit or saliva.
  • Bloated abdomen.
  • Then take it the vet immediately.

POISONS

SYMPTONS

  • Extreme saliva
  • Extreme drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Muscle tremors
  • Dilated pupils
  • Seizures

TREATMENT FOR POISONS

BITES AND STINGS

TREATING INSECT BITES

  • First try to find where the bite is on the dog’s body.
  • If there is a stinger scrape it out with your fingernail (BUT MAKE SURE NOT TO PULL IT OUT BECAUSE PULLING IT OUT WILL SQUEEZE MORE VENOM INTO THW DOGS SKIN).

ALLERGIC REACTION TO THE BITES

HOW TO SEE IF YOU’RE DOG HAS A ALLERGIC REACTION TO A BITE OR STING there are more signs which are the common ones?

  • The area of the bite or sting will start swelling.
  • It is really red or really white
  • Muscle aches
  • Fever
  • Diarrhoea
  • Vomiting

WHAT TO DO

  • Call the vet straight away he may advice on an antihistamine {which ones are safe to use?

SNAKE BITES

Non-venomous-

  • Boas
  • Pythons
  • King snakes

Venomous:

  • Elapidae: The coral snake its small with short fangs that paralyze the respiratory system with neurotoxin venom they are red with yellow and black rings.
  • Crotalids: Rattlesnakes, cottonmouths and copperheads are populous in NA They have long, hinged fangs Their venom destroys red blood cells, stops blood clotting, and causes organ degeneration and tissue damage.

SYMPTOMS

Non-venomous snake:

  • Swelling Bruising/visible puncture wounds
  • Bleeding from the wound

Venomous snake:

  • Shaking
  • Tremors
  • Excessive saliva production
  • Rapid and shallow breathing
  • Tissue damage
  • Discoloration and bleeding from the area of the wound
  • Vomiting Blood
  • Dilated pupil
  • Muscle contractions
  • Limb weakness
  • Paralysis

TREATMENT

Non-venomous bite

  • The wound will be cleaned thoroughly with water
  • Take your dog to the vet immediately.

 Venomous bite treatment

  • Take to the vet immediately

There are different cures for different causes of poisons take the label or bottle of the thing that the dog ingested with the name and ingredients.

POISON   CURE
ANTIFREEZE Make the dog vomit and take the dog to the vet straight away.
BLEACH Make the dog vomit and if she doesn’t take the dog to the vet straight away.
CHOCOLATE Make the dog vomit and then call the vet straight away.
PETROL Make the dog vomit and give her vegetable oil to prevent absorptions and take the dog to the vet straight away.
IBUPROFEN Make the dog vomit and take the dog to the vet straight away.
INSECTICIDES If some got onto the skin wash it thoroughly then take the dog to the vet straight away don’t make her vomit unless the vet says so.
RODENT POISON Make the dog vomit and take the dog to the vet straight away.

HOW TO INDUCE VOMITING IN DOGS

  • Give your dog 3% of hydrogen peroxide, depending on your dogs weight you give them 1 teaspoon per 10 pounds so if your dog is 30 pounds you give them 3 teaspoons of hydrogen peroxide.
  • If your dog is more than 90 pounds just give them 9 teaspoons
  • If your dog is not drinking the peroxide mix the peroxide with a little bit of water or a little bit of vanilla ice cream.
  • Walk for the dog for about 15 minutes to coax faster metabolism of the peroxide
  • If the dog hasn’t vomited after 15 minutes give them another dose.

USE SALT

  • Hold the jaw and tilt the head of the dog backwards
  • Using the same hand slide it until your thumb is at the roof of the dog’s mouth.
  • Use the other hand and place the middle finger on top of the lower jaw and pull it down.
  • Have someone help you to put a teaspoon of salt right at the back of its tongue
  • Release the dogs jaw so that it Can close it
  • It should start vomiting and when it is done make sure that the dog does not eat its puke.
  • In three minutes if the dog does not vomit repeat the dosage

BAKING SODA

  • Use one teaspoon of baking soda mixed with half a cup of water
  • Make the dog take tiny sips until it is finished
  • Watch it through the vomiting process to ensure it is safe
  • Calm it down using ginger tea.

AFTER THE DOG HAS VOMITED

  • After inducing vomiting give your dog Activated Charcoal
  • Consult the vet for the dosage

BURNS

WHAT CAUSES BURNS

There are 3 types of burns

  • A thermal burn can be caused by heat from open flames, hot boiling liquids, hot woodstoves, radiators and even sunburns.
  • An electrical burn can be caused by biting on electrical cords.
  • A contact/chemical burn can be caused by petrol, liquid drain cleaners, road salt, bleach and paint thinner.

TREATMENT FOR BURNS

  • For a chemical burn rinse the dog carefully and completely with water it can also be a potential poisoning problem so make sure to consult your vet.
  • If it is not a harsh burn and the skin is just red make sure to keep it clean and watch it cautiously to make sure it doesn’t get infected.
  • If the burn has damaged many layers of skin or is bleeding and oozing or even if it is blistered cover it lightly and take the dog to the vet straight away.

SHOCK

CAUSES

  • Blood loss and fluid loss caused by extensive vomiting, diarrhoea, severe external burns and injury.
  • Recurring illnesses
  • Hazardous materials
  • Internal bleeding

SYMPTOMS

  • The heartbeat is faster and more irregular than usual.
  • Rapid breathing or panting.
  • The eye is not responding to movement its pupils are dilated (widened) and looks as if it is staring at something for a long time.
  • Has a pale or white gum.

TREATMENT FOR SHOCK

  • Stay calm
  • Keep the dog warm if the temperature is subnormal by using a hot water bottle don’t use boiling water or use a blanket
  • Gently massage your dog’s body and legs to continue to keep the blood flowing and maintain circulation. However, don’t rub injured areas.
  • Check your dog’s airway to ensure proper breathing. If the airway is blocked, clear it.
  • Then get her to the vet immediately but carefully any sudden movement could.

HEATSTROKE

CAUSES IN KENYA

  • Hot humid climate
  • Lack of shade
  • Poor ventilation
  • Inadequate cooling-off after exercise
  • Extreme exercise in a hot climate
  • No access to water

SYMPTOMS        

  • Excessive panting and drooling
  • Dehydration (Panting vigorously and lying on its back without moving)
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Red gums
  • Moist tissue of the body
  • Increased body temperature

TREATMENT FOR HEATSTROKE

  • Cool the dog down. Provide them water
  • Soak them in cool water or cover the dog in a cold wet towel but don’t use ice cold water or ice.
  • Take to the vet immediately.

CHOKING

How do you know if it’s choking?

  • Distress,
  • Pawing at the mouth
  • Rubbing their face upon the ground,
  • Gagging/retching a lot
  • Increased salivation.
  • Coughing,
  • Difficulties in breathing

WHAT TO DO

  • Open the mouth and see what is blocking the airway.
  • Reach it with your hand and pull it out if you
  • If not use salad tongs for a big object like a ball or tweezers for small objects like pins.
  • If it is not reachable stand above and behind the dog and reach under her belly behind the ribcage and quickly pull several times.
  • Gravity can help remove the object just hold your dog upside down if it is a small or medium dog pick it up by its hind legs and hold it upside sown and try shake the object out of its mouth
  • If it is a large bog hold it upside down using its hind legs but don’t pick it up make sure its front paws are on the ground then tilt the dog forward just like how you would hold a wheelbarrow.

 

GASTRIC TORSION OR BLOAT

What causes it?              

SYMPTOMS OF GASTRIC TORSION OR BLOAT

  • Swollen abdomen.
  • Forced
  • Pale nose and mouth.
  • Week pulse.

TREATMENT FOR GASTRIC TORSION OR BLOAT  

  • Keep the dog quiet after every meal.
  • Give them two or three small meals instead of a big meal.
  • Lessen the water intake.
  • If the dog is gagging without throwing up take them to the vet straight away.
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Author:

I am a 16-year-old girl who lives in Kenya, I am a Muslim and a Directioner.

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